Unusual Poison Ivy

unusual poison ivy

This is the most common disease I have found on poison ivy plants: red growths on the leaves. Doesn't seem to bother the plant much.

unusual poison ivy

Something has caused these leaves to grow rounded, with a dent where the point would normally go. Perhaps when they were still rolled up together, about to open, the leaf bud was damaged and the points of all three leaflets were gone. Notice that the next leaf up the stem has typical, pointed leaves.

unusual poison ivy

This is a look I have seen on occasion: some of the leaves have a frilly edge. No idea what would cause this, but notice that not all the leaves on the plant look like this.

unusual poison ivy

Another example of strange edge shapes on the leaves. The center leaflet has a net raised edge, all the way around. Unusual, for sure.

unusual poison ivy

This is a problem image. I generally state that poison ivy NEVER has saw-toothed leaf edges, but these are very close to saw-toothed. The exception to the rule, and rare.

unusual poison ivy

Thumbs! Many poison ivy plants have large "thumbs" on the two lower leaflets, but rarely as exaggerated as these. Again, note that the other leaves on this same plant have normal thumbs or no thumbs.

unusual poison ivy

Leaf damage due to attack by an insect, perhaps the "leaf miner," which digs its way inside the leaf. This indicates that the infamous poison ivy oil does not protect the plant from all insect attacks.

unusual poison ivy

This is a pure mutant: the center leaflet is a twin. Without the surrounding normal leaves, I would not have known this is poison ivy.

unusual poison ivy

This is a strange growth that occurs from time to time. It is not a flower stalk, nor is it roots. Research needs to be done.

unusual poison ivy

This is probably a dried version of the odd growth in the photo above. No idea who the guy in orange is, or what he wants from life.

unusual poison ivy

This is likely a set of roots coming out to look for something to hold onto. Perhaps the plant senses the closeness of the rock and sends out roots looking for a grab surface.