Climbing Poison Ivy

climbing poison ivy

Whenever eastern poison ivy climbs, it uses little hairy roots to attach to surfaces. This is also a good chance to see how the leaves branch off to the left, then to the right, rather than straight across from each other.

climbing poison ivy

When there are no leaves climbing, poison ivy can almost always be identified by the hairy roots.

climbing poison ivy

Here we see a typical sight: two trees at the edge of a forest, and poison ivy climbing up both of them.

climbing poison ivy

The thick vine in front of the tree, which curves to the right, is a big poison ivy vine, one that might go up 50 feet or more. Vines can be six inches thick, and climb over 100 feet tall.

climbing poison ivy

In spring, a lacework of poison ivy climbing this fence reaches out toward the path, with little red leaves sprouting from each branch.

climbing poison ivy

A tree trunk is covered with a massive poison ivy vine, which then sticks its branches out, looking for sun. Many people mistake these for branches of the actual tree, with bad consequences.

climbing poison ivy

Where eastern poison ivy climbs, it is not hard to find it at eye level or overhead along a trail. You push the branch away, and the next day: misery. 

climbing poison ivy

Here a poison ivy vine climbs a tree next to a little league field. 

climbing poison ivy

Here poison ivy climbs up inside an evergreen, then sends branches outwards, looking for sun.

climbing poison ivy

Poison ivy loves buildings, especially old ones. If not dealt with, this entire building will be covered in poison ivy in a few years. (Those are trees on the far left and right, not poison ivy.)

climbing poison ivy

Utility poles are favorites for poison ivy since they are usually out in the sun. 

climbing poison ivy

Poison ivy is a champion climber. On any surface, man-made or not, it will climb until it runs out of vertical surface to cling to.